Congratulations to dr. Jamie Joyce!

On 19 February 2019, it was time for Jamie Joyce to defend his dissertation and obtain the title of Doctor of Philosophy. We want to congratulate him on his achievement, and wish him every success in his further career.

Jamie’s thesis is available in Open Access from http://dare.ubvu.vu.nl/handle/1871/55924. The ROMFARMS model, that is at the core of his work, can be downloaded from http://modelingcommons.org/browse/one_model/5687#model_tabs_browse_info.

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Final project volume now out

Our final project volume, “Finding the Limits of the Limes; Modelling Demography, Economy and Transport on the Edge of the Roman Empire” is now available online in Open Access through Springer. With the publication of this volume, we formally conclude the project, but there will be some more papers coming out of it, see keep watching this space!

PhD defence Jamie Joyce

And another happy announcement: Jamie Joyce will be publicly defending his PhD thesis entitled “Farming along theĀ limes. Using agent-based modelling to investigate possibilities for subsistence and surplus-based agricultural production in the Lower Rhine region between 12 BCE and 270 CE” on 19 Feb 2019 at 09:45 in the Aula at the Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam.

New project papers

This week, the proceedings of the LAC2014 conference have been published in Open Access at lac2014.proceedings.nl. It includes the papers of the session “Computational modeling in landscape archaeology: back to the drawing board?” organized and edited by Philip Verhagen, Marieka Brouwer Burg and Thomas G. Whitley. Two project-related papers can be found here: Simulating the Farm: Computational Modelling of Cattle and Sheep Herd Dynamics for the Analysis of Past Animal Husbandry Practices and Modelling the Dynamics of Demography in the Dutch Roman Limes Zone.

Last week, we also published a paper with Ivo Vossen in Journal of Archaeological Science: Reports, on dealing with the chronological difficulties in our archaeological database. It is available in Open Access: Now you see them, now you don’t: Defining and using a flexible chronology of sites for spatial analysis of Roman settlement in the Dutch river area.